Deep Web Browser

Version 7.0.8 | Rank 15/113 at CHIP in category: Anonymization

Advantages

  • works without manual configuration.
  • 2.seamless change between the deep web and “normal” internet.

Disadvantage

  • brakes internet connection.

The CHIP editorial says:

For a first look at the Deep Web also known as the “Dark Internet,” we recommend running the “Deep Web Browser” in the Tor network.

 The Tor Browser Bundle, available for free download here, is based on the Firefox browser and gives you easy access to the Deep Web.

When talking about the Deep Web, it’s mainly because criminals go about their illegal business and buy and sell porn, drugs or weapons. The massive parallel universe of the Deep Web is not only for illegal purposes, and it is worth a look, even if you have nothing indecent in mind.

Access to the Deep Web: Go to the Darknet with the Tor Browser

 

Once installed the Tor Browser, you can not only visit the “normal” Internet but also easily surf the Web pages in the Deep Web. A first starting point could be, for example, the address http://wikitjerrta4qgz4.onion, which has numerous deep web pages listed and provides information about it. Another exciting starting point could be TorLinks (http://torlinkbgs6aabns.onion), an alphabetically ordered link list for the Deep Web.

Make Tor Browser Faster: That’s the way it works

Surfing with Tor is technically-slower than in a normal browser, because every request takes a detour. That’s the price you have to pay for the anonymity gained. If surfing with Tor Browser but really slow, you can usually counter. Making our goal faster in our article: Here’s how we show you which set screws you can turn to accelerate Tor a bit. Otherwise, we recommend: Even if it no longer meets the zeitgeist, waiting often helps. Simply grab a coffee, reload the page you want and Tor Browser comes back on track. Often a new identity helps, which you can get over the Tor-Button.

last changes

Version 7 uses the latest Firefox ESR as a basis. The included modules, including HTTPS Everywhere, OpenSSL and NoScript, have been updated and many bugs have been fixed. You can find the complete changelog on the manufacturer’s blog.